Pain Management

YOU DO NOT HAVE TO LIVE WITH PAIN…

Chronic pain syndromes are caused by many different diseases and conditions. These have created serious disabilities, lifestyle limitations, incapacitation, and led to useless surgeries, causing great suffering and needless expense. Mind-body connections play a crucial role in all pain relief. No condition is all physical or all emotional but eighty to eighty-five percent of diseases are exacerbated or completely caused by psychological emotions.

 

You have probably been endlessly chasing the cure for any persistent or recurrent body pain. You are stretched, manipulated and twisted like a pretzel. You try acupuncture… you meditate or practice yoga or take Pilates classes… you do specific exercises like special core training… you stretch… you swim. In desperation you take dangerous and addictive drugs and, you may even have contemplated or undergone surgery to alleviate the pain.

 

But what if we been working in the wrong area of the body… what if where the pain is situated in your body is not the source but merely the symptom of your pain?

Heal Your Pain… permanently… with NO Drugs… NO Surgery… NO Physical Therapy…

 

What if the source of you pain was accumulated stress psychologically trapped in your body and, your body, in an attempt to alert you to the stress overload, creates pain in different parts of your body? Pain shifting to different areas of your body is one clear sign of stress related pain.

 

When the stresses of life get too much, your mind and body will react in a variety of different ways to try to handle the stress… one way the body copes with stress is by creating tension, which creates a change in blood flow to muscles, nerves and/or tendons… it creates what we call an emotional pain blockage.

The tension is the result of stress… and this can be in the form of repressed emotions stemming from relationship stress… family stress… workplace stress… stress about finances… stress concerning you or your family’s personal safety… and stress from exposure to a traumatic event.

 

These emotions are considered too terrible and dangerous by your unconscious mind and therefore, your unconscious emotional mind represses these “dangerous” emotions.

 

This repression begins a process that produces the emotional blockage… the pain and other symptoms including weight gain or chronic weight loss.  It is a condition that affects your muscles, nerves and tendons, and can cause pain, sometimes very intense pain. Common symptoms also include burning, tingling, numbness and/or weakness, and fatigue anywhere throughout your body.

 

As I said, many times these blockages will show up initially as pain or excess weight in the body and many times both… and eventually, if not resolved, these emotional blockages can lead on to more serious conditions such as anxiety, depression, and illness in the body.

 

Did you know that it is estimated that over 90% visits to the doctor for aliments is stress-related? Hypnotherapy is a powerful way to not only eliminate pain in the body but also to address a multitude of other stress-related issues including depression, eating disorders, OCD, ADD, ADHD, migraines, and anxiety and panic attacks.

Do you or someone you love suffer with pain? I have worked with numerous people, with all types of different pain, and being able to alleviate their pain and reduce it to a point where it is manageable and often, eliminated the pain completely… forever!

 

My name is Paul Holcroft (known as the “uncommon hypnotherapist” for my unique hypnosis style and spiritual healing sessions) and I am Australian and internationally trained and certified in Ericksonian Hypnosis, NLP, Uncommon Psychotherapy, and the “Rewind Technique” (for fast, effective relief from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

 

I am based in Port Macquarie but plan regular “uncommon hypnotherapy” road trips up and down the east coast of Australia. If you are not in Port Macquarie and would like to take advantage of one of my road trips, please contact me to be put on the notification list. I can be contacted on 0424 671 411 or message me through Facebook. If you are not currently on my friends list, please send a friend request, and don’t forget to visit my website: http://innerhealthblog.com or check out my inner health hypnotherapy Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/innerhealthblog

 

Testimonials:

“Hypnotherapy? It works! If you like reading miracle stories, then this one’s for you!

 

I’m a 32 yr old woman who suffered from chronic Sacroiliac joint (lower back) pain for 17 years. I had tried everything from therapeutic remedies to cortisone injections to assist with on-going pain not to mention daily pain relief tablets.

 

Long story put short, I have now been pain free for four months straight and have waited this long to tell my story in case the pain decided to come back and prove me a liar, but it hasn’t!

 

After seeing Paul Holcroft, an International Certified Hypnotherapist stationed at Port Macquarie, my dreams of living a pain free life has finally come true. Between his professional first consult to write a personal script that met my needs, to a comforting session where my integrity and sense of well being was put first, I cannot fault Paul’s passion to want to heal others.

 

Despite my sceptical preconceptions regarding hypnotherapy, I was and am still shocked of the results. I’m a different person! I no longer have to spend loads of money and time suffering from chronic pain. I can get in the garden and play with my kids without knowing I will suffer later for trying to do everyday stuff that I ‘should’ be able to do.

 

So why did it work? We all have ‘old baggage’ and sometimes we store negative emotions which our body shows through physical pain. Our sub-conscious mind is super clever and holds on to stuff which may be detrimental to our health, and we may be doing it without even realising it!

 

So if you are someone who has suffered from long term pain, maybe you too can benefit from some mind cleansing stress relief. I highly, highly recommend seeing Paul because let’s face it, life’s stressful and we can all benefit from unpacking some ‘bad luggage’ whether you have long term pain or not. Hypnotherapy had changed my life! Live, love, laugh.”

–Leemarie C.

 

And hypnotherapy is not just for pain…

“Hey Paul, Thanks for the call regarding my progress… doing really well. There is a subtle little stream of renewed energy coursing through my veins. I feel relaxed, energised and calm. Have slept really well the past two nights and my anxiety in the mornings has reduced significantly to almost unnoticeable. Thank you.  This renewed sense of myself is exciting and I thank you sincerely for the calm, caring, safe environment you created with my treatment… much gratitude and respect.” –Annie N.

 

And this one…

“Hi Paul, I wanted to say thank you for your hypnotherapy sessions…

They have really helped me got to the origin of my feelings of worthlessness and understand how it has impacted my life in all areas of my life. It was preventing me from moving forward in my career.

It impacted on the quality of my relationships and it often left me feeling helpless. I am now feeling more powerful and in control of my life knowing that I have the strength, ability and determination to achieve anything I have set my mind to.

This quiet self assuredness allows me to face challenges on my own in a confident manner. From the bottom of my heart… thank you for your help and believing in me when I did not believe in myself…that reflection of myself that I saw from you really helped me in ways that I am still comprehending. THANK YOU….xx”

Are You Investing in Your Health?

We are all willing to work hard and invest our time and money into buying a home, a new car, new clothes, new furniture and the latest new phone or gadget… We also invest time with our partners, children and family… but what about investing in us… in our health and wellbeing?

 

While all those things are important… without your mental and physical health they mean nothing. If you are not physically and mentally the best you can be, how can you give your loved ones the type of attention you want to shower on them…? When your mind and body is fatigued other stuff begins to get in the way.

 

If you are not taking care of your mind… feeding it with positive empowering thoughts, beliefs, patterns and habits… and if you are not empowering your body with the right nutrition and physical exercise you are fighting a losing battle… and in the end you just burn out… you no longer have the energy to do things… and fall into negative thought patterns, which can lead to anxiety and depression… and your body begins to create aches and pains and you begin to gain weight…

So how do you fix it? The first thing you must do is stop worrying about anything external from your self… now I do not mean be selfish and self-centred… bus as we have already mentioned… if we are not functioning at our best… then how can we expect to be able to help and support others… to provide adequately for our families? Get you mentally and physically right and everything becomes easier…

 

The first question you want to ask yourself is are you eating right and getting all the nutrition your body and mind needs for optimal performance? If you are not sure then you need to start really thinking about what you are putting into your mouth… ask yourself… while this food may taste fantastic is it going to nourish me… or is it just dead food.

 

Are you taking nutritional supplements on a daily basis…? And we are not talking about the cheap multivitamins and minerals regularly available on your supermarket or chemist shelves… w e mean a powerful effective quality nutritional supplement program that covers all the bases; vitamins, minerals, probiotics, enzymes, amino acids and antioxidants. If not then you need to get onto one now.

 

And do not kid yourself that you will get all you need from the food you eat. Our soils are so depleted of natural minerals and nutrients, it makes it near on impossible to get all the nutrients we need from the food we eat… even if you eat only organically grown food.

    Eliminate Pain and Stress with Hypnotherapy

The next step is to address your stress levels. Latest research has shown that stress is a major factor in pain, illness and disease in the body. We are constantly bombarded with stress on a daily basis through relationship stress, family stress, workplace and schoolyard stress, environmental stress and media stress through our TVs and social media sites.

 

These constant stresses build up and eventually create emotional and psychological blockages in our bodies. These emotional and psychological blockages are the source of a lot of the pain in our bodies… even long-term chronic pain. Add to that the stress of our bodies trying to deal with all the toxins created by these stresses and you have a toxic bombshell… no wonder our populations are becoming obese.

 

Stress release methods like yoga, meditation, mindfulness, counselling, cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and emotional freedom technique (EFT) are all useful ways to handle stress in our lives, but by far the fastest and most effective way is through hypnosis, and results can often be achieved in just one session.

 

So what can you do about it right now?

 

  1. Book yourself in for a stress and pain elimination hypnotherapy session. Use the Facebook message system to contact me or you can email me here

 

  1. Get on a powerful quality nutritional supplement program. We recommend this one: https://synergestic.le-vel.com

 

Take these two initial steps and combine with a fun exercise program and you will be absolutely amazed at the results in as little as a few weeks.

 

Based in the coastal city of Port Macquarie on the NSW mid-north coast of Australia, Paul Holcroft is an Australian and internationally trained and certified hypnotherapist specializing in Erickson Hypnosis, Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP), Regression and Time Line Therapy and the Rewind Technique (specifically designed for dealing with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Phobias). Use the Facebook message system to contact me or you can email me here

What is Stress and What Causes It?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that up to 90% of all illness and disease is due to stress.

girl-1467820_960_720

Stress is your body’s way of responding to any kind of demand or threat. Signs of the body under stress include irritability, fatigue, high blood pressure, impaired sleeping and insomnia. The effects of stress can be emotional, psychological, and physical.

 

Constant stress, if not treated, can lead to changes in behaviour (emotional eating, smoking, increased alcohol consumption) and a precursor to anxiety disorders, depression, PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) and many chronic illnesses in the body.

 

When you feel threatened, your nervous system responds by releasing a flood of stress hormones, including adrenaline and Cortisol, which activates the flight or fight centre of the brain (the amygdala) to rouse the body for emergency action.

 

Cortisol is a steroid hormone produced by the adrenal gland and secreted during a stress response. As a part of the body’s fight-or-flight response, Cortisol also acts to suppress the body’s immune system.

 

Serotonin is a neurotransmitter thought to play an important role in mood regulation. Stress-induced serotonin dysfunctions have been associated with anxiety, fear and depression-like symptoms.

 

Stress can kill the good bacteria and yeast that live in your intestines and keep your immunity and digestive health strong. More research is showing how stress impacts the function of your gut every day.

 

It slows transit, leading to constipation and the re-circulation of hormones like estrogen through your liver. It increases the overgrowth of bad bacteria. And it loosens the barriers between the cells that line the intestines, creating something called leaky gut that then leads to inflammation, food sensitivities and even autoimmune disease.

 

Studies have also shown that the activity of hundreds of genes responsible for enzymes that break down fats and detoxify prescription drugs, are negatively impacted by stress. Stress can also increase your toxin burden by increasing your desire for high fat, high sugar foods.

 

Stress is the body’s reaction to any stimuli that disturbs its equilibrium. When the equilibrium of various hormones is altered the effect of these changes can be detrimental to the immune system.

 

Stress affects the immune system in many ways. The immune system protects the body from viruses, bacteria, and anything that is different or that the body does not recognize. The immune system sees these as intruders and it sends messages to attack. The white blood cells, leukocytes, are very important to the immune system.

 

The white blood cells, leukocytes, are very important to the immune system. These leukocytes produce cytokines which fight infections.[47] But they also are the immune systems communicator in telling the brain that the body is ill.

 

When an individual is stressed or going through a stressful experience the immune system starts to produce natural killer cells and cytokines.[48] When levels of cytokines are higher they combat infections and therefore the brain gets communicated the body is ill and it produces symptoms as if the individual was ill.

 

These symptoms include fever, sleepiness, low energy levels, no appetite, and flu like symptoms. These symptoms mean the body is fighting the illness or virus. This is useful for when the body goes through the stress from an injury.

 

But unfortunately, the body has now evolved to do this process during stressful events such as taking exams, or even going through a life changing event such as a death of a family member or a divorce. That is why many times when individuals are stressed because of life changing events or situations such as those, they get these symptoms and believe they are sick when in reality it can be because the body is under stress.

 

Both negative and positive stressors (endurance sports) can lead to stress, the intensity and duration of stress changes depending on the circumstances and emotional condition of the person suffering from it. Some common categories and examples of stressors include:

 

Sensory input such as pain, bright light, noise, temperatures, or environmental issues such as a lack of control over environmental circumstances, such as food, air and/or water quality, housing, health, freedom, or mobility.

 

Social issues can also cause stress, such as struggles with difficult individuals, social defeat, relationship conflict, deception, or break ups, and major events such as birth and deaths, marriage, and divorce.

 

Life experiences such as poverty, unemployment, clinical depression, obsessive compulsive disorder, heavy drinking or insufficient sleep can also cause stress. Students and workers may face performance pressure stress from exams and project deadlines.

 

Adverse experiences during development like prenatal exposure to maternal stress, poor attachment (abandonment) histories and sexual abuse) are thought to contribute to deficits in the maturity of an individual’s stress response systems.

sad-girl-1382940__180

 

Stages of Stress

Physiologists define stress as how the body reacts to a stressor (real or imagined) which is a stimulus that causes stress. Acute stressors affect an organism in the short term; chronic stressors over the longer term.

 

General Adaptation Syndrome (GAS), developed by Hans Selye, is a profile of how organisms respond to stress; GAS is characterized by three phases: a nonspecific mobilization phase, which promotes sympathetic nervous system activity; a resistance phase, during which the organism makes efforts to cope with the threat; and an exhaustion phase, which occurs if the organism fails to overcome the threat and depletes its physiological resources.

 

Stage One

Alarm is the first stage, which is divided into two phases: the shock phase and the anti-shock phase.

 

Shock phase: During this phase, the body can endure changes such as the stressor effect.

Anti-shock phase: When the threat or stressor is identified or realized, the body starts to respond (Cortisol) and is in a state of alarm (flight or fight).

 

Stage Two

Resistance is the second stage and increased secretion of glucocorticoids play a major role, intensifying the systemic response—they have lipolytic, catabolic and antianabolic effects: increased glucose, fat and amino acid/protein concentration in blood.

In high doses, Cortisol begins to act as a mineralocorticoid (the steroid hormone aldosterone which maintains salt level in the body) and brings the body to a state similar to hyperaldosteronism (excessive secretion of aldosterone).

 

If the stressor persists, it becomes necessary to attempt some means of coping with the stress. Although the body begins to try to adapt to the strains or demands of the environment, the body cannot keep this up indefinitely, so its resources are gradually depleted.

 

Stage Three

The third stage could be either exhaustion or recovery.

 

Recovery follows when the system’s compensation mechanisms have successfully overcome the stressor effect (or have completely eliminated the factor which caused the stress). The high glucose, fat and amino acid levels in blood prove useful for anabolic reactions, restoration of homeostasis and regeneration of cells.

 

Exhaustion is the alternative third stage in the GAS model. At this point, all of the body’s resources are eventually depleted and the body is unable to maintain normal function. The initial autonomic nervous system symptoms may reappear (sweating, raised heart rate, etc.).

 

If stage three is extended, long-term damage may result (prolonged vasoconstriction results in ischemia which in turn leads to cell necrosis), as the body’s immune system becomes exhausted, and bodily functions become impaired, resulting in decompensation.

 

The result can manifest itself in obvious illnesses, such as peptic ulcer and general trouble with the digestive system (e.g. occult bleeding, melena, constipation/obstipation), diabetes, or even cardiovascular problems (angina pectoris), along with clinical anxiety, panic attacks, depression and other mental illnesses.

 

Chronic Stress

Chronic stress is defined as a state of prolonged tension from internal or external stressors, which may cause various physical manifestations – e.g., asthma, back pain, arrhythmias, fatigue, headaches, HTN, irritable bowel syndrome, ulcers, and suppress the immune system.

 

Chronic stress takes a more significant toll on the body than acute stress does. It can raise blood pressure, increase the risk of heart attack and stroke, increase vulnerability to anxiety and depression, contribute to infertility, and hasten the aging process.

 

People in distressed marriages have also been shown to have greater decreases in cellular immunity functioning over time when compared to those in happier marriages.

 

Furthermore, during chronic stress, Cortisol is over produced, causing fewer receptors to be produced on immune cells so that inflammation cannot be ended.

 

Chronic stress has been shown to increase the thickness of the artery walls, leading to high blood pressure and heart disease.

 

Chronic stress also increases the production of Cortisol, leading to something called “Cortisol steal,” where fewer sex hormones are produced.

 

Chronic stress is seen to affect the parts of the brain where memories are processed through and stored. When people feel stressed, stress hormones get over-secreted, which affects the brain.

 

That is because stress releases Cortisol, and Cortisol causes metabolic activity throughout the body. Metabolic activity is raised in the hippocampus. High Cortisol levels can be tied to the deterioration of the hippocampus and decline of memory that many older adults start to experience with age.

 

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

PTSD is a severe anxiety disorder that can develop after exposure to any event that results in psychological trauma. This event may involve the threat of death to oneself or to someone else, or to one’s own or someone else’s physical, sexual, or psychological integrity, overwhelming the individual’s ability to cope. As an effect of psychological trauma, PTSD is less frequent and more enduring than the more commonly seen acute stress response.

 

Diagnostic symptoms for PTSD include intrusion, avoidance and hyper-arousal — re-experiencing the original trauma(s) through “flashbacks” or nightmares (intrusion), emotional numbing or avoidance of stimuli associated with the trauma, and increased arousal, such as difficulty falling or staying asleep, anger, and hyper-vigilance.

 

Formal diagnostic criteria (both DSM-IV-TR and ICD-10) require that the symptoms last more than one month and cause significant impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning.

 

The areas of the brain affected in post-traumatic stress disorder are sensory input, memory formation and stress response mechanisms. The regions of the brain involved in memory processing that are implicated in PTSD include the hippocampus, amygdala and frontal cortex. While the heightened stress response is likely to involve the thalamus, hypothalamus and locus coeruleus.

 

Memory

Cortisol works with epinephrine (adrenaline) to create memories of short-term emotional events; this is the proposed mechanism for storage of flash bulb memories, and may originate as a means to remember what to avoid in the future. However, long-term exposure to Cortisol damages cells in the hippocampus; this damage results in impaired learning. Furthermore, it has been shown that Cortisol inhibits memory retrieval of already stored information.

 

Atrophy of the hippocampus in post traumatic stress disorder

There is consistent evidence from MRI volumetric studies that hippocampal volume is reduced in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This atrophy of the hippocampus is thought to represent decreased neuronal density. However, other studies suggest that hippocampal changes are explained by whole brain atrophy (partial or complete wasting away) and generalised white matter atrophy is exhibited by people with PTSD.

 

The psychiatric diagnosis post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was coined in the mid-1970s, in part through the efforts of anti-Vietnam War activists and the Vietnam Veterans against the War, and Chaim F. Shatan. The condition was added to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders as posttraumatic stress disorder in 1980.

 

PTSD was considered a severe and ongoing emotional reaction to an extreme psychological trauma, and as such often associated with soldiers, police officers, and other emergency personnel.

 

The stressor may involve threat to life (or viewing the actual death of someone else), serious physical injury, or threat to physical or psychological integrity including sexual abuse, domestic violence, workplace and schoolyard bullying, or a serious accident.

 

In some cases, it can also be from profound psychological and emotional trauma, apart from any actual physical harm or threat. Often, however, the two are combined.

 

Depression

Many areas of the brain appear to be involved in depression including the frontal and temporal lobes and parts of the limbic system including the cingulate gyrus. However, it is not clear if the changes in these areas cause depression or if the disturbance occurs as a result of the etiology (branch of medical science concerned with the causes and origins of diseases) of psychiatric disorders.

 

In depression, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis undergoes upregulation with a down-regulation of its negative feedback controls and Cortisol is released from the adrenal glands; adrenal hypertrophy (excessive growth) can also occur.

 

Release of Cortisol into the circulation has a number of effects, including elevation of blood glucose. The negative feedback of Cortisol to the hypothalamus, pituitary and immune system is impaired. This leads to continual activation of the HPA axis and excess Cortisol release. Cortisol receptors become desensitized leading to increased activity of the pro-inflammatory immune mediators and disturbances in neurotransmitter transmission.

 

Serotonin transmission from both the caudal raphe nuclei and rostral raphe nuclei is reduced in patients with depression compared with non-depressed controls. Increasing the levels of serotonin in these pathways, by reducing serotonin reuptake and hence increasing serotonin function, is one of the therapeutic approaches to treating depression.

 

In depression the transmission of noradrenaline is reduced from both of the principal noradrenergic centres – the locus coeruleus and the caudal raphe nuclei. An increase in noradrenaline in the frontal/prefrontal cortex modulates the action of selective noradrenaline reuptake inhibition and improves mood. Increasing noradrenaline transmission to other areas of the frontal cortex modulates attention.

girls-602168__180

 

How to Control and Reduce Stress

There are several ways of coping with stress such as controlling the source of stress or learning to set limits and to say “no” to some of the demands that bosses, partners or family members may make.

 

A way to control stress is first dealing with what is causing the stress… if it is something the individual has control over. Other methods to control stress and reduce it can be: to not procrastinate and leave tasks for last minute, do things you like, exercise, do breathing routines, go out with friends, and take a break. Having support from a loved one also helps a lot in reducing stress.

 

A person’s capacity to tolerate the source of stress may be increased by thinking about another topic such as a hobby, listening to relaxing music, spending time in nature, or participating in meditation or yoga classes.

 

Hypnotherapy is also a very powerful way to reduce stress build up in the body by teaching the body how to naturally handle and process stress.

 

-Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stress_(biology)

-Source: http://bodyecology.com/articles/top-5-sources-of-toxins.php

 

 

What is Stress and How Does Affect Us?

The young attractive woman with an awful migraine. A headache attack

There are many external and internal forces that trigger stress within our bodies and throw our lives out of balance. Many people will say “that type of thing always stresses me out” or “she or he stresses me out”.

 

Stress is any change in the environment that requires your body to react and adjust in response and can be triggered by relationship difficulties or breakdown, workplace related stress, and environmental stress. The body reacts to these changes with physical, mental, and emotional responses and these emotional stresses store themselves in the body in what are commonly called emotional blockages.

 

Forty-three percent of all adults suffer adverse health effects from stress and seventy-five percent to 90% of all doctor’s office visits are for stress-related ailments and complaints. The earlier we detect and relieve stress, the quicker we can get ourselves back on track.

 

The first thing we need to understand about stress is it is created from within. It is not the event that causes the stress in our body… it is how we interpret, react and respond to the event or embedded internal triggers which creates the stress and creates what are commonly called emotional blockages within the body.

 

So the event is outside, and the stress and emotional triggers and blockages are created from within.

 

When stressed, the body thinks it is under attack and switches to ‘fight or flight’ mode, releasing a complex mix of hormones and chemicals such as adrenaline, Cortisol and norepinephrine to prepare the body for physical action.

 

 

Stress related issues arise when we put our bodies into unnecessary states of stress or by becoming stressed in inappropriate situations. This can lead to an inability to ‘think straight’; and if not addressed, can lead to panic attacks, anxiety, suicidal thoughts and depression.

 

Stress also targets the weakest part of our physiology or character; if you are prone to lower back pain, joint pain, headaches, acne or eczema, this will flare up.  If you have low levels of patience or tolerance for others, this will be the first area to present under times of stress.

 

Many people will try to relieve their stress by turning to alcohol, tobacco, or drugs to try to relieve their stress. Unfortunately, instead of relieving the stress and returning the body to a natural relaxed state, these substances tend to compound the problem by keeping the body in a stressed state which eventually leads to more problems… physical, mental and emotional.

 

Unless these emotional stresses are addressed; they can build up on top of each other and eventually show up in the body as chronic pain (often lower back pain), excess weight and, when years of stress blockages build up, disease in the body.

 

Fortunately Hypnotherapy is a powerful way to address and release emotional blockages and stress triggers from your body and mind. Hypnotherapy is holistic in nature and is about bringing about harmony and balance within… emotionally, physically and mentally.

 

Hypnotherapy is not something that is done to you. The hypnotherapist merely guides you into a deep state of relaxation, also known as a trance, where you are able to shut down the conscious thinking mind for a short time in order to communicate with the unconscious or subconscious mind and uncover tools you can use to enhance your life and wellbeing.

 

Hypnotherapy is not like the common talking therapies such as psychology or counseling. The hypnotherapist works on a deeper level… with the unconscious or subconscious mind (which actually runs the show) rather than the talking to the conscious analytical thinking mind.

 

Hypnotherapy is NOT like what you see with stage hypnotists… we don’t make you run around like a chicken… a hypnotherapist is a healer and may incorporate several different methodologies within the hypnotherapy session including; Erickson Hypnosis, Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP), Time Line Therapy and the Rewind Technique.

 

The outcomes and powerful results that can be achieved through hypnotherapy are many and varied and can include personal, professional, emotional and health benefits at extraordinary levels.

 

Paul Holcroft is a certified Hypnotherapist trained in Erickson Hypnosis, Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP), Regression and Time Line Therapy and the Rewind Technique which is specifically designed for dealing with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Phobias. Message me or call on 0424 671 411 to arrange an obligation-free initial consultation to see if I can be of help.

 

However stress is not all bad, stress is necessary and can sometimes even be desirable. Exciting or challenging events such as the birth of a child, participating in a challenging sport, completion of a major work project or moving to a new city generates as much stress as does tragedy or disaster. And without it, life would be dull.

 

In the modern world, the ‘fight or flight’ mode can still help us survive dangerous situations, such as reacting swiftly to a person running in front of our car by slamming on the brakes. The blood flow is going only to the most important muscles needed to handle the situation.

 

The Rewind Technique for PTSD is now Available in Port Macquarie

The Rewind Technique breaks new ground in the treatment of acute psychological trauma and PTSD – the invisible injury – and is a proven, natural, safe and effective treatment that is non-drugs based.

 

What is Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a natural emotional reaction to a deeply shocking and disturbing experience. It is a normal reaction to an abnormal situation.

 

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is defined in DSM-IV, the fourth edition of the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual. For a doctor or mental health professional to be able to make a diagnosis, the condition must be defined in DSM-IV or its international equivalent, the World Health Organization’s ICD-10.

 

In the previous version of DSM (DSM-III) a criterion of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder was for the sufferer to have faced a single major life-threatening event; this criterion was present because a) it was thought that PTSD could not be a result of “normal” events such as bereavement, business failure, interpersonal conflict, bullying, harassment, stalking, marital disharmony, working for the emergency services, etc, and b) most of the research on PTSD had been undertaken with people who had suffered a threat to life (eg combat veterans, especially from Vietnam, victims of accident, disaster, and acts of violence).

 

In DSM-IV the requirement was eased although most mental health practitioners continue to interpret diagnostic criterion A1 as applying only to a single major life-threatening event. There is growing recognition that Post Traumatic Stress Disorder can result from many types of emotionally shocking experience including an accumulation of small, individually non-life-threatening events in which case the resultant PTSD is referred to as Complex PTSD.

 

Who Can it Benefit?

Knowing why you suffer and being able to stop the suffering are two different things. People who are suffering from the following symptoms can expect success with the Rewind Technique:

  • Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).
  • Domestic Violence, Harassment and Stalking.
  • Sexual Abuse and Rape Victims.
  • Physical and Psychological Abuse.
  • Child Abuse (physical and psychological).
  • Natural Disasters.
  • Major Life-Threatening Event such as road, rail and aircraft accidents, physical assault, kidnapping, terror attack, hostage situations.
  • Loss of child through miscarriage, stillborn or at a young age.
  • Bereavement or Loss of a Loved One.
  • Interpersonal Conflict and Marital Disharmony.
  • School and Workplace Bullying- see http://innerhealthblog.com/bullying-post-traumatic-stress-disorder-ptsd/
  • Acute Stress due to working for the emergency services.
  • Acute Anxiety and Panic Attacks.
  • Business Failure.

 

Is it Safe?

The Rewind technique is totally safe. No harm can come to people by using this technique, unlike some other talking therapies where the trauma can be embedded deeper.

 

It is also safe for the Rewind practitioner. In other treatments, the practitioner’s can become traumatised by hearing a traumatic account or by repeatedly hearing traumatic experiences. Using Rewind, they do not need to hear or know any of the details to perform the treatment.

 

In addition, Rewind is non voyeuristic. A person who has been raped, for example, can undergo the treatment without, if they so wish, having to talk to the counsellor about any of the intimate details of the experience.

 

The technique works by allowing the traumatised individual, whilst in a safe and relaxed state to reprocess the traumatic memory in question so that it becomes stored as a ordinary, albeit unpleasant, and non-threatening memory, rather than one that continually activates a terror response.

 

Rewind is safe for the client, and the practitioner, because unlike counselling or debriefing there is no risk of re-traumatising the victim or traumatising the counsellor during treatment.

 

Employers have a responsibility to protect the psychological as well as the physical well being of their employees. Just as with physical hazards, employers are required to assess the psychological workplace risks that their employees face. Failure to put the proper infrastructure in place can leave an employer as open for compensation claims as for someone injured at work.

 

How Does The Rewind Technique Work

 

The individual who has suffered the traumatic event is asked to revisit it, but, most importantly from a detached and safe distance, watching the events unfold mentally through a television screen providing an emotional distance between themselves and the event in question.

 

It’s a common assumption that your thoughts determine your feelings, but actually your amygdala produces emotion before your thinking brain gets a look in. Strong feelings need to be quicker than thought for basic survival. The acute trauma sufferer doesn’t recall the event as a memory… they re-experience it. Resolving acute trauma needs to work with the preverbal unconscious responses.

 

Rewind is not counselling and trying to get someone who is deeply traumatised to ‘talk about it’ may only make it worse as ‘getting back into the memory’ re-traumatises the person (see http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12076399). It is essential to note that PTSD and trauma symptoms are not suitable for counselling; indeed talking therapies may embed the trauma further and possibly vicariously traumatise the counsellor.

For more information and to book a free initial consultation contact Paul Holcroft on 0424 671 411

Bullying Post Traumatic Stress Disorder-PTSD

PTSD resulting from accident, disaster, war, terrorism, torture, kidnap, etc has been extensively studied and literature is available elsewhere. The first written reference to PTSD symptoms comes from the sixth century BC; Post Traumatic Stress Disorder is nothing new – and neither is the willingness of some people to discredit and deny the existence of the disorder.

 

This section of Bully OnLine focuses on PTSD and Complex PTSD resulting from bullying, primarily in the workplace, however anyone suffering PTSD (however caused) will find this page enlightening.

 

Most of the information on this page and web site is relevant to other types of bullying, eg at school, in relationships (including domestic violence), by families, by neighbours or landlords, in the care of the elderly, in the armed services, etc.

 

Bullying is behind harassment, discrimination, prejudice and persecution, therefore targets of repeated sexual harassment or racial discrimination or religious or ethnic persecution will also identify with the symptoms. The insight about bullying on this web site is therefore also relevant to more serious issues including physical abuse, repeated verbal abuse, sexual abuse, violent crime, kidnap, abduction, rape, war, terrorism, torture, and denial and abuse of human rights. Those exploring Contact Experience may also find this page helpful.

PTSD, Complex PTSD and Bullying

It’s widely accepted that PTSD can result from a single, major, life-threatening event, as defined in DSM-IV. Now there is growing awareness that PTSD can also result from an accumulation of many small, individually non-life-threatening incidents.

 

To differentiate the cause, the term “Complex PTSD” is used. The reason that Complex PTSD is not in DSM-IV is that the definition of PTSD in DSM-IV was derived using only people who had suffered a single major life-threatening incident such as Vietnam veterans and survivors of disasters.

 

Note: there has recently been a trend amongst some psychiatric professionals to label people suffering Complex PTSD as a exhibiting a personality disorder, especially Borderline Personality Disorder. This is not the case – PTSD, Complex or otherwise, is a psychiatric injury and nothing to do with personality disorders.

 

If there is an overlap, then Borderline Personality Disorder should be regarded as a psychiatric injury, not a personality disorder. If you encounter a psychiatrist, psychologist or other mental health professional who wants to label your Complex PTSD as a personality disorder, change to another, more competent professional.

 

It seems that Complex PTSD can potentially arise from any prolonged period of negative stress in which certain factors are present, which may include any of captivity, lack of means of escape, entrapment, repeated violation of boundaries, betrayal, rejection, bewilderment, confusion, and – crucially – lack of control, loss of control and disempowerment.

 

It is the overwhelming nature of the events and the inability (helplessness, lack of knowledge, lack of support etc) of the person trying to deal with those events that leads to the development of Complex PTSD.

 

Situations which might give rise to Complex PTSD include bullying, harassment, abuse, domestic violence, stalking, long-term caring for a disabled relative, unresolved grief, exam stress over a period of years, mounting debt, contact experience, etc. Those working in regular traumatic situations, e.g. the emergency services, are also prone to developing Complex PTSD.

 

A key feature of Complex PTSD is the aspect of captivity. The individual experiencing trauma by degree is unable to escape the situation. Despite some people’s assertions to the contrary, situations of domestic abuse and workplace abuse can be extremely difficult to get out of.

 

In the latter case there are several reasons, including financial vulnerability (especially if you’re a single parent or main breadwinner – the rate of marital breakdown is approaching 50% in the UK), unavailability of jobs, ageism (many people who are bullied are over 40), partner unable to move, and kids settled in school and you are unable or unwilling to  move them. The real killer, though, is being unable to get a job reference – the bully will go to great lengths to blacken the person’s name, often for years, and it is this lack of reference more than anything else which prevents people escaping.

 

Until recently, little (or no) attention was paid to the psychological harm caused by bullying and harassment. Misperceptions (usually as a result of the observer’s lack of knowledge or lack of empathy) still abound: “It’s something you have to put up with” (like rape or repeated sexual abuse?) and “Bullying toughens you up” (ditto). Armed forces personnel faced threats of being labelled with “cowardice” and “lack of moral fibre” (LMF) if they gave in to the symptoms of PTSD.

 

In World War I, 306 British and Commonwealth soldiers were shot as “cowards” and “deserters” on the orders of General Haig in an act which today would be treated as a war crime – see separate page on this injustice.

 

In the UK at least 16 children kill themselves each year because they are being bullied at school. This figure is established in the book Bullycide: death at playtime. Each of these deaths is unnecessary, foreseeable, and preventable.

 

The UK has one of the highest adult suicide rates in Europe: around 5000 a year. The number of adults in the UK committing suicide because of bullying is unknown. Each year 19,000 children attempt suicide in the UK – one every half hour.

 

In the UK, suicide is the number one cause of death for 18-24-year-old males. Females also attempt suicide in large numbers but tend to use less successful means.

 

Since Andrea Adams first identified workplace bullying and gave it its name in 1988, recognition of adult bullying has grown steadily. Tim Field’s UK National Workplace Bullying Advice Line has logged over 8000 cases in seven years; in the majority of cases (over 80%), the caller is a white-collar worker who has become the prey of a serial bully whose behaviour profile suggests a disordered personality.

 

Callers refer to predecessors who have had stress breakdowns, taken early or ill-health retirement, or been dismissed on grounds of ill-health – all caused by the same individual. Sometimes callers refer to suicides of fellow employees.

 

Mapping the health effects of bullying onto PTSD and Complex PTSD
Repeated bullying, often over a period of years, results in symptoms of Complex Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. How do the PTSD symptoms resulting from bullying meet the criteria in DSM-IV?

 

  1. The prolonged (chronic) negative stress resulting from bullying has lead to threat of loss of job, career, health, livelihood, often also resulting in threat to marriage and family life. The family are the unseen victims of bullying.

A.1.One of the key symptoms of prolonged negative stress is reactive depression; this causes the balance of the mind to be disturbed, leading first to thoughts of, then attempts at, and ultimately, suicide.
A.2.The target of bullying may be unaware that they are being bullied, and even when they do realise (there’s usually a moment of enlightenment as the person realises that the criticisms and tactics of control etc are invalid), they often cannot bring themselves to believe they are dealing with a disordered personality who lacks a conscience and does not share the same moral values as themselves. Naivety is the great enemy. The target of bullying is bewildered, confused, frightened, angry – and after enlightenment, very angry. For an answer to the question Why me? click here.

 

B.1. The target of bullying experiences regular intrusive violent visualisations and replays of events and conversations; often, the endings of these replays are altered in favour of the target.
B.2. Sleeplessness, nightmares and replays are a common feature of being bullied.
B.3. The events are constantly relived; night-time and sleep do not bring relief as it becomes impossible to switch the brain off. Such sleep as is achieved is non-restorative and people wake up as tired, and often more tired, than when they went to bed.
B.4. Fear, horror, chronic anxiety, and panic attacks are triggered by any reminder of the experience, e.g. receiving threatening letters from the bully, the employer, or personnel about disciplinary hearings etc.
B.5. Panic attacks, palpitations, sweating, trembling, ditto.
Criteria B4 and B5 manifest themselves as immediate physical and mental paralysis in response to any reminder of the bullying or prospect of having to take action against the bully.

 

  1. Physical numbness (toes, fingertips, lips) is common, as is emotional numbness (especially inability to feel joy). Sufferers report that their spark has gone out and, even years later, find they just cannot get motivated about anything.

C.1. the target of bullying tries harder and harder to avoid saying or doing anything which reminds them of the horror of the bullying.
C.2. Work, especially in the person’s chosen field becomes difficult, often impossible, to undertake; the place of work holds such horrific memories that it becomes impossible to set foot on the premises; many targets of bullying avoid the street where the workplace is located.
C.3. Almost all callers to the UK National Workplace Bullying Advice Line report impaired memory; this may be partly due to suppressing horrific memories, and partly due to damage to the hippocampus, an area of the brain linked to learning and memory (see John O’Brien’s paper below)
C.4. the person becomes obsessed with resolving the bullying experience which takes over their life, eclipsing and excluding almost every other interest.
C.5. Feelings of withdrawal and isolation are common; the person just wants to be on their own and solitude is sought.
C.6. Emotional numbness, including inability to feel joy (anhedonia) and deadening of loving feelings towards others are commonly reported. One fears never being able to feel love again.
C.7. The target of bullying becomes very gloomy and senses a foreshortened career – usually with justification. Many targets of bullying ultimately give up their career; in the professions, severe psychiatric injury, severely impaired health, refusal by the bully and the employer to give a satisfactory reference, and many other reasons, conspire to bar the person from continuance in their chosen career.

 

D.1. Sleep becomes almost impossible, despite the constant fatigue; such sleep as is obtained tends to be unsatisfying, unrefreshing and non-restorative. On waking, the person often feels more tired than when they went to bed. Depressive feelings are worst early in the morning. Feelings of vulnerability may be heightened overnight.
D.2. The person has an extremely short fuse and is often permanently irritated, especially by small insignificant events. The person frequently visualises a violent solution, e.g. arranging an accident for, or murdering the bully; the resultant feelings of guilt tend to hinder progress in recovery.
D.3. Concentration is impaired to the point of precluding preparation for legal action, study, work, or search for work.
D.4. the person is on constant alert because their fight or flight mechanism has become permanently activated.
D.5. The person has become hyper sensitized and now unwittingly and inappropriately perceives almost any remark as critical.

 

  1. Recovery from a bullying experience is measured in years. Some people never fully recover.

 

  1. For many, social life ceases and work becomes impossible; the overwhelming need to earn a living combined with the inability to work deepens the trauma.

 

Common symptoms of PTSD and Complex PTSD that sufferers report experiencing

hyper vigilance (may feel like paranoia, but see HERE for key differences between paranoia and hyper vigilance)

  • exaggerated startle response
  • irritability
  • sudden angry or violent outbursts
  • flashbacks, nightmares, intrusive recollections, replays, violent visualisations
  • triggers
  • sleep disturbance
  • exhaustion and chronic fatigue
  • reactive depression
  • guilt
  • feelings of detachment
  • avoidance behaviours
  • nervousness, anxiety
  • phobias about specific daily routines, events or objects
  • irrational or impulsive behaviour
  • loss of interest
  • loss of ambition
  • anhedonia (inability to feel joy and pleasure)
  • poor concentration
  • impaired memory
  • joint pains, muscle pains
  • emotional numbness
  • physical numbness
  • low self-esteem
  • an overwhelming sense of injustice and a strong desire to do something about it

Definition of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a natural emotional reaction to a deeply shocking and disturbing experience. It is a normal reaction to an abnormal situation.

 

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is defined in DSM-IV, the fourth edition of the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual. For a doctor or mental health professional to be able to make a diagnosis, the condition must be defined in DSM-IV or its international equivalent, the World Health Organization’s ICD-10.

 

In the previous version of DSM (DSM-III) a criterion of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder was for the sufferer to have faced a single major life-threatening event; this criterion was present because a) it was thought that PTSD could not be a result of “normal” events such as bereavement, business failure, interpersonal conflict, bullying, harassment, stalking, marital disharmony, working for the emergency services, etc, and b) most of the research on PTSD had been undertaken with people who had suffered a threat to life (eg combat veterans, especially from Vietnam, victims of accident, disaster, and acts of violence).

 

In DSM-IV the requirement was eased although most mental health practitioners continue to interpret diagnostic criterion A1 as applying only to a single major life-threatening event. There is growing recognition that Post Traumatic Stress Disorder can result from many types of emotionally shocking experience including an accumulation of small, individually non-life-threatening events in which case the resultant PTSD is referred to as Complex PTSD.