The Rewind Technique for PTSD is now Available in Port Macquarie

The Rewind Technique breaks new ground in the treatment of acute psychological trauma and PTSD – the invisible injury – and is a proven, natural, safe and effective treatment that is non-drugs based.

 

What is Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a natural emotional reaction to a deeply shocking and disturbing experience. It is a normal reaction to an abnormal situation.

 

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is defined in DSM-IV, the fourth edition of the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual. For a doctor or mental health professional to be able to make a diagnosis, the condition must be defined in DSM-IV or its international equivalent, the World Health Organization’s ICD-10.

 

In the previous version of DSM (DSM-III) a criterion of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder was for the sufferer to have faced a single major life-threatening event; this criterion was present because a) it was thought that PTSD could not be a result of “normal” events such as bereavement, business failure, interpersonal conflict, bullying, harassment, stalking, marital disharmony, working for the emergency services, etc, and b) most of the research on PTSD had been undertaken with people who had suffered a threat to life (eg combat veterans, especially from Vietnam, victims of accident, disaster, and acts of violence).

 

In DSM-IV the requirement was eased although most mental health practitioners continue to interpret diagnostic criterion A1 as applying only to a single major life-threatening event. There is growing recognition that Post Traumatic Stress Disorder can result from many types of emotionally shocking experience including an accumulation of small, individually non-life-threatening events in which case the resultant PTSD is referred to as Complex PTSD.

 

Who Can it Benefit?

Knowing why you suffer and being able to stop the suffering are two different things. People who are suffering from the following symptoms can expect success with the Rewind Technique:

  • Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).
  • Domestic Violence, Harassment and Stalking.
  • Sexual Abuse and Rape Victims.
  • Physical and Psychological Abuse.
  • Child Abuse (physical and psychological).
  • Natural Disasters.
  • Major Life-Threatening Event such as road, rail and aircraft accidents, physical assault, kidnapping, terror attack, hostage situations.
  • Loss of child through miscarriage, stillborn or at a young age.
  • Bereavement or Loss of a Loved One.
  • Interpersonal Conflict and Marital Disharmony.
  • School and Workplace Bullying- see http://innerhealthblog.com/bullying-post-traumatic-stress-disorder-ptsd/
  • Acute Stress due to working for the emergency services.
  • Acute Anxiety and Panic Attacks.
  • Business Failure.

 

Is it Safe?

The Rewind technique is totally safe. No harm can come to people by using this technique, unlike some other talking therapies where the trauma can be embedded deeper.

 

It is also safe for the Rewind practitioner. In other treatments, the practitioner’s can become traumatised by hearing a traumatic account or by repeatedly hearing traumatic experiences. Using Rewind, they do not need to hear or know any of the details to perform the treatment.

 

In addition, Rewind is non voyeuristic. A person who has been raped, for example, can undergo the treatment without, if they so wish, having to talk to the counsellor about any of the intimate details of the experience.

 

The technique works by allowing the traumatised individual, whilst in a safe and relaxed state to reprocess the traumatic memory in question so that it becomes stored as a ordinary, albeit unpleasant, and non-threatening memory, rather than one that continually activates a terror response.

 

Rewind is safe for the client, and the practitioner, because unlike counselling or debriefing there is no risk of re-traumatising the victim or traumatising the counsellor during treatment.

 

Employers have a responsibility to protect the psychological as well as the physical well being of their employees. Just as with physical hazards, employers are required to assess the psychological workplace risks that their employees face. Failure to put the proper infrastructure in place can leave an employer as open for compensation claims as for someone injured at work.

 

How Does The Rewind Technique Work

 

The individual who has suffered the traumatic event is asked to revisit it, but, most importantly from a detached and safe distance, watching the events unfold mentally through a television screen providing an emotional distance between themselves and the event in question.

 

It’s a common assumption that your thoughts determine your feelings, but actually your amygdala produces emotion before your thinking brain gets a look in. Strong feelings need to be quicker than thought for basic survival. The acute trauma sufferer doesn’t recall the event as a memory… they re-experience it. Resolving acute trauma needs to work with the preverbal unconscious responses.

 

Rewind is not counselling and trying to get someone who is deeply traumatised to ‘talk about it’ may only make it worse as ‘getting back into the memory’ re-traumatises the person (see http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12076399). It is essential to note that PTSD and trauma symptoms are not suitable for counselling; indeed talking therapies may embed the trauma further and possibly vicariously traumatise the counsellor.

For more information and to book a free initial consultation contact Paul Holcroft on 0424 671 411

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